Period Pain

“We need to treat the root, not just the branch”

About

Period Pain

Period Pain and Acupuncture

JUST BECAUSE IT’S COMMON, DOES THAT MEAN IT’S NORMAL?

Traditional gynaecology has a long history in Chinese medicine. ‘The Essential Prescriptions of the Golden Chest’ for example, is a highly respected text which was first published in AD220.

This honoured tome contains 3 chapters on gynaecology & discusses over 30 herbal prescriptions used specifically for gynaecological conditions.

Because of their efficacy, today many of these formulas are still widely used all around the world.

Our teachers learned that a balanced menstrual cycle is regular. Ideally it would be regular at about 28 days but the length may vary between individuals. The cycle should be regular, pretty much the same number of days every cycle.

We are taught we should not suffer with pre-menstrual symptoms, for example: irritability, anxiety, mood swings, breast distension, nausea, constipation, food cravings, headaches, teariness, murderous tendencies or fluid retention. No. No. And No!

Your practitioner may also want to know:

  • Is your bleed ‘robust’ – or perhaps the volume is heavy or light?
  • Is it red, watery, perhaps brown?
  • Are there clots? What size?
  • Is there pain? When (eg: during/before or after period/ovulation)?
  • Is the pain dull or spasmodic, sharp or stabbing? Where is it? And is it relieved by heat?
  • Do you ovulate?

Your responses to these kinds of questions gives your practitioner information about the nature of your condition.

Your amazing body is actually communicating to us what the problem is by expressing these symptoms and by listening carefully, we are better able to help your body to correct. 

Addressing period pain very often involves taking herbal prescriptions alongside acupuncture & sometimes moxibustion treatment.

For further reading:  Is Period Pain The New Normal?

How Can Acupuncture Help You?

“Acupressure showed evidence of pain relief while acupuncture improved both the mental and the physical components of quality of life”

Research

Dysmenorrhoea (period pain)

1) Abaraogu, U. O., & Tabansi-Ochuogu, C. S. (2015). As Acupressure Decreases Pain, Acupuncture May Improve Some Aspects of Quality of Life for Women with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis. J Acupunct Meridian Stud, 8(5), 220-228.

2) Smith CA, Armour M, Zhu X, Li X, Lu ZY, Song J. Acupuncture for dysmenorrhoea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016;4:Cd007854.

3) Xu, T., Hui, L., Juan, Y. L., Min, S. G., & Hua, W. T. (2014). Effects of moxibustion or acupoint therapy for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea: a meta-analysis. Altern Ther Health Med, 20(4), 33-42.

Endometriosis

1) Adamson, G. D. et al. (2010). Creating solutions in endometriosis: global collaboration through the World Endometriosis Research Foundation. J Endometriosis, 2(1), 3-6.

2) Endometriosis (2010). In Concise Medical Dictionary: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 15 Mar. 2017, from http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199557141.001.0001/acref-9780199557141-e-3153.

3) Eskenazi, B., & Warner, M. L. (1997). Epidemiology of endometriosis. Obstetrics and gynecology clinics of North America, 24(2), 235-258.

4) Pitts, M. K., et al. (2008). Prevalence and correlates of three types of pelvic pain in a nationally representative sample of Australian women. Med J Aust, 189(3), 138-43.

5) Sinaii, N., et al. (2007). Treatment utilization for endometriosis symptoms: a cross-sectional survey study of lifetime experience. Fertility and sterility, 87(6), 1277-1286.

6) Rubi-Klein, K., et al. (2010). Is acupuncture in addition to conventional medicine effective as pain treatment for endometriosis?: A randomised controlled cross-over trial. European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 153(1), 90-93.

Introductory Package

Curious to try out some acupuncture and cost-effectively? Our Introductory Package is currently available. This investment in your health gives you an initial consultation / acupuncture treatment + two follow up treatments for $242 (saving you $43).

And if you’re in a health fund with ‘Extras’ cover you can claim back more of this cost on top of the savings as well.

Hannam Vale

Healing Room
199 Deep Creek Rd,
Hannam Vale
NSW 2443
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Forgiving Foods
Shop 8, Haven Plaza, Bold St
Laurieton
NSW 2443
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Taree

Hands Om Healing
Suite 2, 214 Victoria St
Taree
NSW 2430
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